Sustainable Development Goal Number 2: Zero Hunger

Goal 2: End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture. It is time to rethink how we grow, share and consume our food.

If done right, agriculture, forestry and fisheries can provide nutritious food for all and generate decent incomes, while supporting people-centred rural development and protecting the environment.

Right now, our soils, freshwater, oceans, forests and biodiversity are being rapidly degraded. Climate change is putting even more pressure on the resources we depend on, increasing risks associated with disasters such as droughts and floods. Many rural women and men can no longer make ends meet on their land, forcing them to migrate to cities in search of opportunities.

A profound change of the global food and agriculture system is needed if we are to nourish today’s 795 million hungry and the additional 2 billion people expected by 2050.

The food and agriculture sector offers key solutions for development, and is central for hunger and poverty eradication.

Do you know that 500 million small farms worldwide provide up to 80% of the food consumed in a large part of the developing world. Investing in smallholder women and men is an important way to 📷⬆️ food security and nutrition for the poorest, as well as food production for local and global markets.

Facts and Figures
Hunger
  • Globally, one in nine people in the world today (795 million) are undernourished
  • The vast majority of the world’s hungry people live in developing countries, where 12.9 per cent of the population is undernourished.
  • Asia is the continent with the most hungry people – two thirds of the total. The percentage in southern Asia has fallen in recent years but in western Asia it has increased slightly.
  • Southern Asia faces the greatest hunger burden, with about 281 million undernourished people. In sub-Saharan Africa, projections for the 2014-2016 period indicate a rate of undernourishment of almost 23 per cent.
  • Poor nutrition causes nearly half (45 per cent) of deaths in children under five – 3.1 million children each year.
  • One in four of the world’s children suffer stunted growth. In developing countries the proportion can rise to one in three.
  • 66 million primary school-age children attend classes hungry across the developing world, with 23 million in Africa alone.
Food security
  • Agriculture is the single largest employer in the world, providing livelihoods for 40 per cent of today’s global population. It is the largest source of income and jobs for poor rural households.
  • 500 million small farms worldwide, most still rainfed, provide up to 80 per cent of food consumed in a large part of the developing world. Investing in smallholder women and men is an important way to increase food security and nutrition for the poorest, as well as food production for local and global markets.
  • Since the 1900s, some 75 per cent of crop diversity has been lost from farmers’ fields. Better use of agricultural biodiversity can contribute to more nutritious diets, enhanced livelihoods for farming communities and more resilient and sustainable farming systems.
  • If women farmers had the same access to resources as men, the number of hungry in the world could be reduced by up to 150 million.
  • 1.4 billion people have no access to electricity worldwide – most of whom live in rural areas of the developing world. Energy poverty in many regions is a fundamental barrier to reducing hunger and ensuring that the world can produce enough food to meet future demand.
Goal 2 targets
  • By 2030, end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round
  • By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons
  • By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment
  • By 2030, ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding and other disasters and that progressively improve land and soil quality
  • By 2020, maintain the genetic diversity of seeds, cultivated plants and farmed and domesticated animals and their related wild species, including through soundly managed and diversified seed and plant banks at the national, regional and international levels, and promote access to and fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge, as internationally agreed
  • Increase investment, including through enhanced international cooperation, in rural infrastructure, agricultural research and extension services, technology development and plant and livestock gene banks in order to enhance agricultural productive capacity in developing countries, in particular least developed countries
  • Correct and prevent trade restrictions and distortions in world agricultural markets, including through the parallel elimination of all forms of agricultural export subsidies and all export measures with equivalent effect, in accordance with the mandate of the Doha Development Round
  • Adopt measures to ensure the proper functioning of food commodity markets and their derivatives and facilitate timely access to market information, including on food reserves, in order to help limit extreme food price volatility

Sustainable Development Goal Number 2: Zero Hunger

This week (08 – 14 January 2018), our focus is on Goal number 2 of the #sustainabledevelopmentgoals which targets to end hunger and ensure access by the poor and people in vulnerable situations in particular, with emphasis on infants to safe nutritious and sufficient food all year round.

Here’s how we’ll do it: https://t.co/rkKVJB8r8b https://t.co/f8tfStHjTo

Every day too many men and women across the globe struggle to feed their children a nutritious meal. In a world where we produce enough food to feed everyone, 815 million people – one in nine – still go to bed on an empty stomach each night. Even more – one in three – suffer from some form of malnutrition. Eradicating hunger and malnutrition is one of the great challenges of our time. Not only do the consequences of not enough – or the wrong – food cause suffering and poor health, they also slow progress in many other areas of development like education and employment.

In 2015 the global community adopted the 17 Global Goals for Sustainable Development to improve people’s lives by 2030. Goal 2 – Zero Hunger – pledges to end hunger, achieve food security, improve nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture, and is the priority of the World Food Programme.

Every day, WFP and its partners work to bring us closer to a zero hunger world. With our humanitarian food assistance, we provide nutritious food to those in urgent need. Meanwhile our complementary programmes address the root causes of hunger, building the resilience of communities, so we don’t need to keep saving the same lives each year.

The world has made great progress in reducing hunger: There are 216 million fewer hungry people than in 1990-92, despite a 1.9 billion increase in the world’s population. But there is still a long way to go, and no one organization can achieve Zero Hunger if it works alone. If we want to see a world free of hunger by 2030, governments, citizens, civil society organizations and the private sector must collaborate to invest, innovate and create lasting solutions.

Did you know that about 800 million people in the world are chronically undernourished & might not know from where their next meal is going to come? The food and agriculture sector offers key solutions for development, and is central for hunger and poverty eradication. Learn about Goal 2 of the #sustainabledevelopmentgoals & what it aims to achieve by 2030 : http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/hunger/

More children die of undernutrition than of AIDS, malaria & tuberculosis combined. Stay on top of the facts

Education = one step closer to ending hunger. WFP school meals are changing lives around the world →

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Sustainable Development Goal 1: No Poverty

Happy New Year, everyone!

In 2018, we’ll highlight one of the #sustainabledevelopmentgoals each week.

We are happy to kick-off with Sustainable Development Goal Number 1: No Poverty

No automatic alt text available.Do you know that 1 in 5 people in developing countries lives on less than $1.90 per day? We can #EndPoverty.

Goal 1 of the #sustainabledevelopmentgoals includes targets to build the resilience of the poor and reduce their exposure to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters.

Here’s how we’ll do it: http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/poverty/ 

Commemorating International Migrants Day in Cameroon

Statistics from the International Organization for Migration (IOM) indicate that 1700 Cameroon migrants are concerned by the merchandising of black Africans in the Maghreb countries. Moreover, despite the growing hostility, illegality and insecurity encountered by migrants, global statistics reveal that 258 million migrants roam the world in search of better living conditions. This was disclosed during the official ceremony co-organised to mark the 2017 International Migrants Day on 18 December 2017, at MINREX by the UN System on the theme; “Cross-border migration: Stakes and challenges for Cameroon”. In attendance was Mrs. Allegra Baiocchi; UN Resident Coordinator in Cameroon.

Mr. Boubacar Seybou; Head of Mission of IOM Cameroon harped on the role of the international community to show solidarity as he emphasised that “Migrants are victims of human trafficking, separated from their families and maltreated. You are a migrant, I am a migrant, we are migrants, together let us take action for migrants wherever and whoever they are, making it a beneficial opportunity for migrants and the countries that welcome them so that they may live well even beyond their borders”.

UNIC’s NIO; Jean Njita presented the storyline and projected the documentary “Wallah Je te jure”, a 24 mins film produced by the IOM. This tells the stories of men and women travelling along West African migration routes to Italy, Senegal’s rural villages, Niger’s bus stations and “ghettos” full of traffickers, Italian squares and houses will be backdrops of these courageous trips, which often end in tragedy. No matter the cost, the goal to reach Europe will be achieved, “Wallah”. But there are those who tired from the journey, turn back home.

Wallah – je te jure (short 23 min English)

Wallah – je te jure (short 23 min French)

Mr. Abou Omar; Director of cooperation with the Islamic world at Ministry of External Relations reiterated government’s commitment in creating a conduisive economic, social and cultural relationships with other countries for a better protection of their citizens who migrate, he cited an example; the Franco-Cameroon convention for social security.

Conference Debate on “Cross-border migration: Stakes and challenges for Cameroon”

Moderated by Mr Yves Tsala of the NGO “Solutions aux migrations clandestine (SMIC)”, the panel discussion had as panelists;

  1. Boubacar Seybou of IOM who focused on “Migration management”,
  2. Mrs Njikam Sanatou (MINREX) dwelt on “Refugess and migration issues”,
  3. Mr Landry Hubert Mbozo’o (National Social Insurance Fund) stressed on “Migration and Social Security”.

The three panelists disclosed that migration in itself was not a bad thing, but illegal migration is. They advised any individual embarking on a journey to obtain the legal documents and avoid the risks and dangers involved in illegal migration. They also insisted on the assistance of the government and its partners such as IOM, to returnees from this dangerous adventure across the Sahara desert (some were present in the hall).

Discussions continued with rich exchanges between panelists and participants, with questions such as;

  • What is the difference between a refugee and a migrant?
  • Does the IOM organize conferences to sensitize migrants on migration and the economic situations of countries they wish to migrate to?
  • How does the government protect her citizens in the other countries? Is there a system which keeps her updated with exact number of migrants in the world?

Dr. Boubacar Seybou insisted that, migrants must not take boats to migrate, it is necessary to migrate in a legal way and this way should not be reserved only to elites but to everyone.

UNIC Yaounde provided information kits comprised of; UNSG’s message on the migrants day (French and English), the storyline of the movie “Wallah je te jure”, and the Africa Renewal edition of December 2016 – March 2017 with a special on “Migrants risk all for better lives”. This kit with specific statistics for Africa was distributed to all participants.

 

Year in Review 2017

The year 2017 marked a shift in leadership at the United Nations as Secretary-General António Guterres began his term at a time of heightened global challenges. The world’s fastest-growing refugee crisis unfolded in Myanmar while the threat of famine loomed over Yemen, South Sudan, Nigeria and Somalia. Resolved to forestall crises before they occur, Secretary-General Guterres launched a series of reforms aimed at advancing meditation and prevention. These build on past successes, including the proud legacy left by the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, which closed its doors after reshaping the global approach to war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide. As the United Nations rises to the world’s collective security challenges, the voices of the people most affected resound with greater meaning for our common future.

Year in Review 2017 is available for download via the following links.

Arabic | Chinese | English | French | Kiswahili | Portuguese | Russian | Spanish
International Version | Audio Stems

2017 in Photos

Secretary-General António Guterres began his tenure in January 2017, as we commenced a year that saw a continuation of many of the flashpoints and fault lines of the year prior: continued conflict, escalating tensions, refugee and humanitarian crises spurred on by conflict and drought. Hurricanes devastated parts of the Caribbean, with great loss of life and widespread destruction. In 2017 one truth was readily apparent – the work of the United Nations is as vital now as ever.

UN News: In Case You Missed It – 2017

UN News presents a look back at some of the noteworthy news developments that took place over the past year in the UN system.

UN Web TV – Top Videos of 2017

UN Web TV Most Watched Events of 2017
UN YouTube channel Top 10 Videos of 2017

The entire breadth of multimedia resources available from the United Nations may be reviewed at http://www.unmultimedia.org/.

L’ONU encourage le Cameroun à réduire les tensions dans les régions anglophones [Scroll down for English Version]

New York, 8 août 2017 – La Vice-Secrétaire générale des Nations Unies, Amina J. Mohammed, a rencontré mardi 8 août au siège de l’ONU à New York une délégation du Cameroun avec qui elle a discuté de la situation dans les régions anglophones du pays, a indiqué le porte-parole du Secrétaire général de l’ONU dans un compte rendu de cette rencontre.

Lors de cette rencontre avec la délégation menée par le Professeur Paul Ghogomu, Ministre et Directeur de cabinet du Premier ministre du Cameroun, Mme Mohammed s’est félicitée « des efforts entrepris par le gouvernement pour réduire les tensions et a souligné l’importance de renforcer les mesures de renforcement de la confiance, notamment en veillant à ce que la justice soit accordée à tous et que les droits de l’homme soient respectés », a précisé le porte-parole.

La Vice-Secrétaire générale a réitéré la volonté des Nations Unies, grâce aux bons offices du Représentant spécial du Secrétaire général pour l’Afrique centrale et Chef du Bureau régional des Nations Unies pour l’Afrique centrale (UNOCA), François Louncény Fall, et à l’équipe-pays des Nations Unies, de soutenir les efforts de dialogue inclusif pour répondre aux causes profondes des tensions dans les régions touchées.

Selon la presse, le gouvernement avait ordonné fin avril le rétablissement de l’Internet dans les deux régions anglophones du pays après une interruption de plus de trois mois suite à des revendications sur le bilinguisme.

Par ailleurs, Mme Mohammed a félicité le Cameroun pour sa générosité envers les réfugiés de la République centrafricaine et du Nigéria. Elle a indiqué que les Nations Unies souhaitaient travailler avec le Cameroun, le Nigéria et le Tchad pour réintégrer les personnes concernées, en particulier les femmes, les jeunes et les enfants.

Le Vice-Secrétaire générale et le chef de la délégation camerounaise ont également discuté du Programme de développement durable à l’horizon 2030 et de la réforme du système de développement des Nations Unies, ainsi que de la situation dans la péninsule de Bakassi et de la lutte contre Boko Haram.

Readout of the Deputy Secretary-General’s meeting with a delegation led by Prof. Paul Ghogomu, Director of Cabinet of the Prime Minister of Cameroon

New York, On 8 August, the Deputy Secretary-General met with a delegation led by Prof. Paul Ghogomu, Minister and Director of Cabinet of the Prime Minister of the Republic of Cameroon. They discussed the internal situation in the Republic of Cameroon, particularly in the Anglophone regions. The Deputy Secretary-General welcomed the efforts being undertaken by the Government to de-escalate tensions and highlighted the importance of further confidence building measures, including ensuring that justice is given to all and that human rights are upheld and respected, and noting that those responsible for rule of law are to be held to a higher standard.

The Deputy Secretary-General also reiterated the willingness of the United Nations, through the good offices of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Central Africa and Head of the United Nations Regional Office for Central Africa (UNOCA), Mr. François Louncény Fall, and the United Nations country team, to support inclusive dialogue efforts to address the outstanding root causes of the tensions in the affected regions.

The Deputy Secretary-General commended Cameroon for its generosity towards refugees from Central African Republic and Nigeria and conveyed that the United Nations looks forward to working with Cameroon, Nigeria and Chad to reintegrate those affected, especially women, youth and children.

The Deputy Secretary-General and Prof. Ghogomu also discussed the 2030 Agenda and the United Nations development system reform, as well as the situation in the Bakassi Peninsula and the fight against Boko Haram.

 

UN Peacekeeping Chief on the dire situation in the Central African Republic

New York, 28 July 2017 

Addressing the Security Council yesterday on the Central African Republic, the Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations, Jean-Pierre Lacroix, warned that the increased intensity of attacks on civilians and peacekeepers risks bringing us rapidly to a tipping point, which ‘we must forestall at all cost’.

He was referring to the worsening security and humanitarian situation in Bangassou, in the south-east part of the country, where three peacekeepers were killed since last Sunday when they came under attack by self-defence groups affiliated to anti-Balaka while trying to secure access to water sources for the 2,000 displaced civilians. 

Mr. Lacroix also raised serious concerns about the deterioration of the security situation in the border town of Zemio, 290 km east of Bangassou, with the risk of further clashes between the Muslim community and elements affiliated with anti-Balaka, which had already led to the displacement of more than 22,000 civilians. He also mentioned that the security situation in the town of Bria, in the north of the country, remains fragile and that the departure of the Ugandan and American forces from the eastern part of the country this spring has created a vacuum leading to the emergence of hostile ‘self-defence’ groups. 

He also drew attention to the worsening humanitarian situation. Since last year, the number of internally displaced persons has increased by almost 40 percent while, at the same time, attacks against humanitarian personnel, convoys and infrastructure have intensified. 

Mr. Lacroix noted that this violence is taking place against the backdrop of sustained fighting in the south-east of the country, heightened inter-ethnic tensions and efforts by spoilers to manipulate communities along religious lines and undermine the stabilization process in the country. 

Mr. Lacroix updated the Council on the robust posture taken by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Central African Republic (MINUSCA) and its efforts to reinforce Bangassou through re-deployments of additional peacekeepers in order to stabilize the situation, stop the attacks on internally displaced persons, enable the delivery of humanitarian assistance and address the threat of the anti-Balaka affiliated groups. 

However, Mr. Lacroix stressed yet again that a military solution to the problem of the armed groups will not suffice to address the root causes of the conflict. The absence of tangible progress in the peace process risks further worsening the situation. He emphasised the importance of operationalizing the July 17 roadmap by the members of the African Initiative for Peace and Reconciliation and underlined the importance of prioritising the implementation of the ceasefire agreed upon in the Rome agreement of 20 June. He reiterated the UN’s commitment to support the mediation efforts by the African Initiative in line with MINUSCA’s mandate. 

He also pressed the Council to put the Central African authorities before their responsibility to foster national reconciliation and protect and serve all Central Africans, including minorities, while welcoming the Council’s readiness to impose sanctions on spoilers. 

MINUSCA continues to support the Government to advance national reconciliation and is intensifying political advocacy by mobilizing local, traditional, religious and national authorities to counter incendiary speech and advocate for all Central Africans to contribute to prevent the situation from relapsing. In the last weeks, the Mission has undertaken a series of visits with the national authorities to Bangassou and Zemio to promote reconciliation. 

Mr. Lacroix finally paid tribute to the 13 peacekeepers who lost their lives since the beginning of the year as a result of attacks against them, including nine in Bangassou and surroundings alone.

Mr. Lacroix is heading over the weekend to the Central African Republic to convey a message of support to MINUSCA and engage with the national authorities. 

United Nations Celebrate Mandela’s Life and Legacy in Yaounde

At a moment when Cameroon is going through difficult security issues and social unrest, when the English speaking regions are manifesting their grievances of marginalization by the Central Government in Yaounde since November 2016, Mandela’s example of leadership was preached as a model of compromise, negotiation and reconciliation for an all-inclusive society. This message of hope was echoed during an outreach event organized by UNIC Yaounde at the National Centre for the Rehabilitation of Persons with Disabilities, at the Etoug-Ebe neighborhood in Yaounde. This Centre admits persons with different degrees of disabilities, most of them cases of emergency. This event comprised:

  • Guided visit to patients of the Centre
  • Panel discussion on The Mandela day themes
  • Screening the movie; “INVICTUS”

Guided visit to patients of the Centre

 

To demonstrate Mandela’s love and service to humanity, UN staff and invitees, in 67 minutes paid a guided visit to 67 patients and persons with disabilities admitted in respective wards (Pavillon) of the Centre. During this visit, the patients received words of comfort, hugs and symbolic gifts from the Mandela change-makers. These gifts were composed of detergents, cubes of soap and toothpastes.

Panel discussion on the Mandela day themes

Mrs Grace Formuluh; Director General of the National Centre welcomed participants, lauded the UN for choosing the institution to celebrate Mandela’s legacy, as their daily actions reflect the Mandela philosophy of selfless service to humanity. She narrated the several material challenges of the Centre she heads, and appealed for more support from people of goodwill.

This was immediately followed by a panel discussion moderated by Jean Njita.

Mrs Bih Suzanne Awenti, National Pedagogic Inspector of History and Citizenship Education at the Ministry of Secondary Education (MINESEC), who dwelt on the global theme of “Take action and Inspire change”.  She narrated Mandela’s iography, situating his lifestyle as that of a selfless man who sacrificed all forms of comfort for the wellbeing of his fellow South Africans. She traced Mandela’s life from birth through his actions within the African National Congress party (ANC), life in prison, and rise to power as President of South Africa. She emphasized that Mandela’s stewardship as President was that of reconciliation, and the building of an inclusive, free, just, and prosperous rainbow South Africa for all; Afrikaners, Africans, etc. This was manifested through the Truth and Reconciliation Commission put in place by Mandela to heal the wounds of the apartheid era in South Africa, she added.

Dr Victor Manyim, Director of International Leadership University (ILU) centred his presentation on the 2017 theme: “action against poverty”. After a scholarly definition of poverty, he stated that poverty is understood in this context as a situation where “one who lacks income and cannot provide for his/her material needs”. He further added that poverty is increasing because root causes which are cultural and spiritual have so far not been sufficiently addressed. The University don in distinguishing between material and spiritual poverty, stated that spiritual wealth is the act of being rich (dignity) even though being materially poor, while spiritual poverty is the act of being poor (humble), even when one is materially rich. He called on the society to adopt an inclusive attitude, to reflect Mandela’s legacy in our daily life. For “it is only when the materially rich show humility and cater for the needs of the materially but dignified poor that we can bridge the gap and effectively fight poverty in our society

These exchanges were interspersed by sketches played by secondary school students, in which the achievements of Mandela were re-echoed. (see link: https://youtu.be/Rwm7gqycFmA). There was also a display of some sustainable items produced by students of Mario Secondary School to fight against poverty.

 Screening the movie; “INVICTUS”

During the same event, participants watched the movie; “INVICTUS“, which portrays how, Mandela used Sports (Rugby) to show strong leadership, and reconcile South Africans around an ideal of success, and brought about national Unity.

UN Electoral Assistance Mission Meets Journalists in Yaounde, on 13 July 2017

UNIC Yaounde organized a rencontre between the visiting delegation from the UN Division of Electoral Assistance of the Department of Political Affairs (DPA) in New York and Cameroonian Journalists on the country’s electoral system at the UNDP conference room on 13 July 2017.

The main objective of this rencontre was to reflect with these media practitioners on Cameroon’s electoral system, and on possible ways forward.

In attendance were the following:

UN:

  1. Mr Akinyemi Adegbola; Head of Mission, and Chief Political and Electoral Adviser, DEA/DPA
  2. Mrs Pascale Roussy; Officer-in-Charge; DEA/DPA in New York
  3. Nadjita Francis; Special Assistant to SRSG for Central Africa (UNOCA) in Libreville, Gabon

Media

We had Journalists representing the following media organ; The Post, Mutations, la Nouvelle Expression, Canal 2 International, Cameroon Tribune, Signatures, amongst others.

This Need Assessment Mission of the Elections Assistance Division from United Nations Headquarters in New York is in Cameroon from 10 – 20 July 2017, upon the invitation of the national electoral body; Elections Cameroon (ELECAM), to explore ways of supporting the country in her electoral process, as she prepares for the 2018 general elections. During their stay, members of the delegation will meet with national and religious authorities, Political parties, Civil society Organizations, amongst others dignitaries. They will equally pay field trips to some regions of the country.

UN agency saves 600 stranded migrants in Sahara Desert, but 52 dead in Niger

Walking through desert. Photo: World Bank

27 June 2017 – The United Nations migration agency in Niger has saved more than 600 lives since April 2017 through a new search and rescue operation that targets migrants stranded in Sahara Desert, but 52 did not survive.

“We are enhancing our capacity to assist vulnerable migrants stranded in Northern Agadez, towards the Niger-Libya border,” said Giuseppe Loprete, Niger Chief of Mission for the International Organization for Migration (IOM), in press release issued today.

“Saving lives in the desert is becoming more urgent than ever. Since the beginning of the year we have been receiving frequent calls to rescue victims who embark on this route‎,” Loprete added.

A 22-year-old woman was the only female among the survivors of a rescue mission on 28 May. She left Nigeria in early April hoping for a better future in Europe. There were 50 migrants on the pick-up truck when it left Agadez for Libya, but only six are still alive today.

“We were in the desert for ten days. After five days, the driver abandoned us. He left with all of our belongings, saying he was going to pick us up in a couple of hours, but he never did,” she recalled.

During the next two days, 44 of the migrants died which persuaded the six left to start walking to look for help. “We had to drink our own pee to survive,” she said.

On 9 June, another 92 migrants were also rescued through an IOM search and rescue operation; among them were 30 women and children.

More recently, 24 migrants were taken to Seguedine, where one died on arrival. Among the 23 survivors are migrants from Gambia, Nigeria, Senegal and Cote d’Ivoire. It was not clear for how long they had been walking in the deserts of central Niger. They had been in a group of 75 migrants in three different cars, eventually abandoned by smugglers during the journey north.

IOM has recorded 52 deaths since it launched a new project “Migrants Rescue and Assistance in Agadez Region” (MIRAA) in April. The project will last for 12 months, and aims to ensure the protection of migrants in hard-to-reach areas while also strengthening the management of migration by the Government of Niger.

MIRAA is complementary to the larger initiative “Migrant Resource and Response Mechanism” (MRRM), which aims to bring together in one mechanism a wide range of services and assistance for migrants, including assisted voluntary return to their countries of origin and reintegration once they return.